March 30, 1914—Monday

Sat with the Council of the Twelve in both forenoon and afternoon sessions considering cases of charges against brethren. It became our painful duty to take action by which Brother John W. Woolley was excommunicated from the Church for insubordination and disobedience to the regulations of the Church. It may be here stated that Brother Woolley, according to evidence and his own confession, has been instrumental in bringing about the unauthorized and sinful pretenses for plural marriage in the cases of other brethren who have been of late visited with the extreme penalty of excommunication.

Deseret Evening News, 30 March 1914

EXCOMMUNICATION.

John C. Woolley, For Insubordination to the Discipline and Government of the Church.

Today by unanimous vote of the Council of the Twelve Apostles, John W. Woolley was excommunicated from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for insubordination to the discipline and government of the Church.

FRANCIS M. LYMAN,

In behalf of the Council,

Salt Lake City, Utah, March 30, 1914.

August 1, 1914

Attended Council meeting of the First Presidency and Twelve in the Temple. This was Fast Day among us, and the meeting included the partaking of the Sacrament. The day is one we shall not soon forget.

September 14, 1914—Monday

During the school periods of 1904-1905, and 1905-1906, I delivered a series of lectures entitled “Jesus The Christ” under the auspices of the University Sunday School. The sessions were held during Sunday forenoons in Barratt Hall. I received written appointment from the First Presidency to embody the lectures in a book to be published for the use of the Church in general. Work on this appointment has been suspended from time to time owing to other duties being imposed upon me. Lately, however, I have been asked to prepare the matter for the book with as little delay as possible. Experiences demonstrated that neither in my comfortable office nor in the convenient study room at home can I be free from visits and telephone calls. The consequence of this condition and in view of the importance of the work, I had been directed to occupy a room in the Temple where I will be free from interruption. I began the work in the Temple today and hope that I shall be able to devote the necessary time thereto […]

September 28, 1914—Monday

Was called to an important interview at the office of the First Presidency at which Dr. Fred J. Pack, my successor to the Professorship of Geology at the University of Utah, was present. We listened to Dr. Pack’s statement of his views concerning the evolution hypothesis.

September 30, 1914—Wednesday

Since I began my work on the Life of Christ I have devoted every possible hour to the labor, oft-times working in the Temple until a late hour at night.

November 9, 1914—Monday

Spent some time at the office of the First Presidency. During the afternoon attended a meeting of the First Presidency and certain invited members of the Deseret Sunday School Union Board. At this meeting I read aloud several chapters of the book, “Jesus the Christ” now in process of preparation, the purpose being to ascertain whether the book would be properly suited for the lower or higher grades in the theological department. As was intended the work is being prepared for our people in general, and is not adapted for use as a text book for immature students. It was decided by the First Presidency that the work be completed of the same scope and plan as heretofore followed, and that the theological department of the Deseret Sunday School Union provide their own outline for the students of the first year’s work in said department.

In connection with the matter of the book it may be well to record here that since my beginning on the writing September 14th last, I have devoted every spare hour to that labor and have at present in written form though not all in revised condition, twenty chapters. According to present indications the work on the book will be interrupted through other appointments already made. The purpose is, however, to bring it to completion at the earliest possible time though with some relief from the intense pressure under which the writing has heretofore been done.

November 15, 1914—Sunday

I was entertained at noon at the home of President Joseph B. Keeler where I met a number of the stake and general officers of the Relief Society; and in the early evening took dinner at the home of Brother Jesse Knight. For the first time I heard from Brother Knight’s own lips the account of the answer to his prayers by which he was placed on the road to abundant prosperity; and his statement is in flat contradiction to the many unauthorized rumors of his having received supernatural visitations by which he was directed to hidden ore bodies. His testimony is given in a spirit of humility and a sincerity; and he is very emphatic in saying that he has never received any such ‘manifestation’ as the promoters of the ‘Dream Mine’ in Utah county, and the Holton ‘Dream Mine’ in Boxelder county, profess to have had. […]

November 19, 1914—Thursday

Spent some time at the office of the First Presidency. During the afternoon attended a meeting of the First Presidency and certain invited members of the Deseret Sunday School Union Board. At this meeting I read aloud several chapters of the book, “Jesus The Christ” now in process of preparation. The purpose being to ascertain whether the book would be properly suited for the lower or higher grades in the theological department. As was intended the work is being prepared for our people in general and is not adapted for use as a textbook for immature students. It was decided by the First Presidency that the work be completed of the same scope and plan as here-to-fore followed, and that the theological department of the Deseret Sunday School Union provide their own outline of the students of the first year’s work in said departments. In connection with the matter of the book, it may be well to record here that since my beginning on the writing September 14th last, I have devoted every spare hour to that labor and have at present in written form though not all in revised condition, twenty chapters. According to present indications, the work of the book will be interrupted through other appointments already made. The purpose is, however, to bring it to completion at the earliest possible time, though with some relief from the intense pressure under which the writing has been hereto-fore done […]

December 19, 1914—Thursday

Yesterday and today I have been engaged for the greater part of the time in the President’s office, and have spent the rest of the time in work on the book.

December 22, 1914—Sunday

Sunday. Devoted a greater part of the tight day to study in the Temple […]

December 25, 1914—Wednesday

Christmas Day. After taking part in the morning rejoicing and enjoying the pleasure of the children at their Christmas Tree and its fruit, I went to the office and spent a few hours in writing. The rest of the day was spent with the family. Albert and Sara came up from Provo and passed the day with us. It was a pleasant and peaceful home Christmas.

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